Category Archives: family

Camp Bestival and the good ol’ British summer!

This summer we were really fortunate to win tickets for the six of us to go to Camp Bestival for the whole weekend, thanks to New Young Mum blog. The children were all very excited, as was I. We spent ages preparing what to take with us, I’m sure the girls packed half their toy boxes!

As the weekend approached it was clear that the weather was not going to be on our side and we were likely to get very muddy. Throwing the wellies and waterproofs into the car, we set off hoping for the best. Daddy was working so would be joining us a little later, meaning that I had the job of setting up a 6 man tent on my own.

When we arrived the children were all very helpful, carrying their belongings to an empty space. I have never been more thankful for our wagon, it was a long walk. Unfortunately the heavens opened just as I was getting the tent out. Upon seeing me battle with wind, rain and canvas, a helpful passerby lent a hand putting up the tent. I never even got her name, but if you’re reading this, you saved me from an epic struggle and probably a few curse words!

Once the tent was up we made a final trip to the car for our remaining items, and set about making the tent cosy. After a cup of tea I felt ready to take the children exploring. We had a  good walk round the site, getting to know the layout and making a list of all we hoped to fit in. We had a go on the helter skelter, watched the insect circus perform  and took obligatory photos in front of the “I love Camp Bestival” sign.

After good look around our tummies were rumbling so we headed back to our tent for some food, and to wait for daddy to arrive. Once Daddy was there we were ready to party! We showed Daddy around and went to the main stage to see Mark Ronson. R absolutely loved it. He played all her favourite songs, she loved the atmosphere and dancing in the rain. It all proved a little much for E and Little S, so Daddy took them back to the tent to tuck them in for the night.

Gig Selfie!

In the morning we woke up stiff, cold and damp, clearly we were meant to be fair weather campers! Still, we tried to make the best of it and made straight for the worlds biggest bouncy castle. As E had an accessible camping pass we were able to join the short queue to go on first. Even then we queued for almost an hour waiting for the bouncy castle to be given the green light to open. Just as we about to go on, having paid our fares, the heavens opened again. The bouncy castle was deemed too slippery in the rain to be safe and we were all turned away. This lead to a major meltdown from E, who until then had been coping relatively well.  The simple change of plans, completely out of his control was too much for him. Eventually after about an hour (and an ice cream) there was a tentative peace.

Next up were Mr Maker and Mr Tumble on the Castle Stage. The little girls were really excited to see them. Daddy chose to stay with them, whilst I took the older two to the sports park. There E made friends with a boy playing boomerang skittles, and R decided to chill out on the hammocks. We played a game of bean bags toss and enjoyed some crazy golf. After Mr Tumble had finished the others came to meet us for a quick play before lunch.

We had burgers in rolls for lunch, which started off well. That is until the rain which had been gentle, became torrential. Soggy bread rolls are not fun! We were soaked, cold and getting grumpy. The tentative lull from meltdown was becoming more like a volcano waiting to erupt. We discussed holding out for the rest of the day to see Madness play, but unfortunately it wasn’t to be. The good ol’ British summer had got the best of us. We packed up and said goodbye to our brief time at Camp Bestival. It was time to go home and have a good hot bath and put on our jammies.

We ended up having to be pushed out of the mud in the car park, but not before someone had a cheeky barefoot dance in the mud! We are grateful to have experienced Camp Bestival but even more thankful to be home and dry.

 

Do you imagine Autism?

My son is disabled. When you hear those words your mind automatically conjures up an image of what that disability might look like. You may imagine a child with cerebral palsy, or in a wheelchair or maybe with a severe mental disability. But do you ever imagine a child with Autism? A child that looks perfectly normal, one that can talk well?

My son was diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder with significant Pathological Demand Avoidance in January this year. At one time it was known as Atypical Autism. He has many of the common Autistic traits but he also has other traits not seen in typical Autism. It also means that, for him, the strategies commonly used for helping a person with Autism cope in everyday life, do not work for him.

He doesn’t cope with a rigid timetable, he needs life to be more flexible and he needs to feel that he is in control of that flexibility too. He needs to be able to choose, but too many different choices will overwhelm him causing him distress. If he feels pressured, or that a demand is being made it causes him to have an anxiety attack or a meltdown. These are often violent, aggressive and out of his control. When he is calm he knows hitting is a bad thing, but in that moment of anxiety, fight or flight takes over. When it is over he often feels guilt but struggles to express that, he finds it very difficult to apologise.

As I’ve learnt more about his condition and him, I’ve begun to understand him much better. He can be quite cruel with his words, like many people with Autism he has no filter. He will say what is on his mind. He doesn’t understand that what he says may hurt someone. For him pain is solely physical. If words have hurt him it’s because they were loud and hurt his ears, causing physical pain.

I once came home from a dog walk in tears, I had had an altercation with another dog walker that had upset me. My son asked if I was crying because the man had hit me. I explained that he had shouted at me and that I was upset. My son then asked me if it had hurt my ears, when I replied no it hadn’t he asked me “well, why are you crying then?”. It became clear he didn’t understand why I should be upset as I wasn’t in physical pain.

I am learning what makes him tick, how he thinks and feels. Knowing this helps me teach him how others think and feel. At times when he is calm I can have wonderful conversations with him. He is a very bright boy, and I’m sure that in time he will begin to understand that others think and feel differently from him. That the ways in which he interacts with others can cause them to think or feel differently to him. He will get there, but for now he needs extra help in understanding his peers and society. Be patient with him.

A family weekend in Cornwall

When you book a break in the UK you’re always taking a risk with the weather, thankfully we had amazing weather at our recent weekend on Cornwall. Every year we have a “family day”, getting together with my parents, brother, his wife and more recently his son too. This year we decided to do something a little different and spend a whole weekend together. We booked a lodge near Bodmin, Cornwall that was able to sleep all 11 of us.

Setting off at lunchtime on Friday after a full cooked breakfast we had 4 very excited little children. We stopped in Honiton for a drink and a cake, and to stretch our legs. The constant “are we there yet?” chides from the children kept going all through the afternoon. Eventually we arrived at Hengar Manor and found our lodge, number 14. The children raced in to explore and choose their beds. I put the kettle on for a much needed cuppa whilst we unpacked the bags.

Uncky C feeding the locals

We met the locals who were clearly fond of new visitors. Once settled we grabbed our cozzies and headed straight for the pool. E was happiest in the Jacuzzi, R was enjoying swimming the length of the pool and trying out the waterslide. The little two loved splashing in the water, alternating between the main pool and the baby pool. Our swim was unfortunately cut a little short when a little boy was sick in the Jacuzzi, and we were evacuated from the pool.

Back at the lodge we had dinner, played and fed the ducks. Granpa, Uncky C and Aunty A had to work so were to join us later. R took herself off to enjoy a relaxing bath in the big corner tub and I tucked the little ones into bed. E was clearly a little overwhelmed by the day and needed the weight of 3 duvets to help him drift of to sleep. I obviously need to invest in a weighted blanket for him. The others joined us late evening and we ate together, eventually headed for bed ourselves at around midnight.

Saturday morning started early with Aunty A coming down to get N some milk at half 5. S and Little S woke at about half 6 and charged upstairs to jump on Granpa! Once everyone was awake Granma realised that some vital components of our breakfast had been left behind in Dorset. So we sent Granpa and S off to the shops to get what we needed. After breakfast we went for a walk with Granpa and Granma whilst N went for his nap .

After popping to the tavern for a bite to eat in the afternoon we did our annual gift giving. The children were truly spoilt once again, receiving lots of new toys. We also enjoyed a party tea together and spent the afternoon playing. We took the children swimming again, this time taking Granpa, Aunty A, Uncky C and N along. Little S loved swimming with Granpa.

Sunday R cooked pancakes for breakfast for everyone, although needed help as the pan wasn’t non-stick. After breakfast Aunty A, Uncky C and N packed their bags and headed home. We went to the pool one last time, taking Granma and Granpa. R enjoyed showing off her impressive swimming skills to her grandparents. After swimming we had lunch and packed our bags up. We decided on a final stroll of the grounds, taking with us the rest of the bird food. We were able to hand feed the ducks which was quite tickly. We visited the park again and expelled some energy before the long drive home. After stopping for a cheeky McDonalds in Exeter, we arrived home just in time for bed.

Hand feeding the ducks

A very busy but fun filled weekend in Cornwall.

My Random Musings

A day in the city

Some times I wonder why I do it. Why do I go to busy places on my own with 4 small children, 1 of whom has diagnosed Autism and 1 who has extra needs. Why do I give myself the added stress? Today was one of those days. I took the children to city.

I was nervous before we left the house about going into the city, and to a museum no less, with all the children. E struggles with museums, they are noisy, busy, claustrophobic and not often very child friendly. Today there was an activity planned for the children to help make a giant Lego art picture. I thought it could be fun.

We went on the park and ride bus as the children love a bus ride. We walked the short distance to the museum, so far so good. As soon as we stepped inside it all started to go wrong. I hadn’t even got my purse out of my bag before E ran out of the museum. I retrieved him and struggled trying to hold him whilst handing over our tickets. Maybe he’ll be fine once we get to the Lego I thought.

R loved the Lego and is looking forward to seeing the finished piece displayed in the local library.  Little S had a go with the Lego but wasn’t able to complete a square for the picture. S decided she would rather just play quietly in the gardens with some of the other children. E threw Lego everywhere, kicked me, tipped over chairs, shouted, tried to run, and hid under the hood of his jacket.

Maybe I should go home? No, I can’t let a meltdown ruin the day for everyone. We walked past a traditional sweetshop and decided to pop in for a look. The children marvelled at all the sweets. We all chose something small and went in search of some lunch. After lunch we went to find our bus and go back to the car.

We had a few minutes wait for the bus, another challenging time for E. I’m on high alert for the next meltdown, as well as watching the 3 girls next to a busy city road. By the time the bus arrived I had to carry E on, and find us a seat.

It must be time to go home right? No, now we must brave the perils of Tesco as the cupboards at home are bare. I have to put Little S in the trolley otherwise she will run around, she is tired now and over stimulated. We’ve barely been inside 2 minutes when E drops his lolly pop from the sweet shop, it shatters all over the floor. He runs to find a hiding place. I spot him curled up in a ball at the end of an aisle, he’s sobbing. I can’t get too close or he’ll run away. I find some shopping items I need on a shelf nearby and pretend he’s not there. I carry on with my shopping, keeping him in my eyeline. I want to go and comfort my crying child but I can’t.

The girls are great, R and S go to nearby aisles for bits we need. Eventually E has calmed and he is ready to talk. I explain that I was able to collect the lolly and wrap it up. It’s safely in my bag so we can wash it when we get home if he would still like it. I know he probably won’t want it, but if I tell him it’s gone forever then he will fall into another meltdown.

We try to complete our shopping as quickly as possible but now E is well and truly ready to go home. I don’t have time to check my list, I just call out items I think we need and the girls grab them and throw them in the trolley. Little S has a pint of milk that she’s clutching in her little hands. She accidentally drops it and it sprays everywhere. Uncontrollable crying ensues. R goes to find a member of staff to help with the spillage and S goes to get another pint of milk for her sister. My two older girls are so helpful and grown up at only 9 and 5.

We finally finish and pay as quickly as possible. The girl behind the checkout is lovely and lets Little S scan some of the shopping. I am completely frazzled. We go home and the kids settled down to watch a film. I put the shopping away and have a much needed cup of tea.

Some days out with my children are amazing, some are well……

My Random Musings

Identifying signs of stress in your child (and helping them cope with it)

Today I have a  guest post from Zara Lewis, a designer, freelance writer, contributing blogger for High Style Life and full time mummy of two little ones. I hope your enjoy reading it as much as I did.

Identifying signs of stress in your child (and helping them cope with it)

According to the data provided by the American Psychology Association, there are a lot of factors that influence children’s well-being and unfortunately – different stress triggers go unnoticed by most of the parents. We are used to associating stress with adulthood but the truth is – kids have their own personal reasons for worrying. They usually fear not being good enough or failing in school, or they struggle with motivation to study, which may be one of the reasons why there is an increase of 62% in the last decade regarding parents who choose homeschooling. Other worries include maintaining relationships with their siblings, handling peer pressure, and parents’ financial state. Here’s how you can help your child cope with stress.

Learn to recognize a cry for help

sad

Too often we perceive everything from our own adult perspective. While objectively, we may think there’s really no reason for our children to worry about anything, it is wrong to disregard their feelings. Your child might approach you and complain about feeling sick or worried and you should never try to solve this situation simply by saying – you’re fine. You need to encourage your child to express their feelings, and formulate what exactly is the thing that’s bothering them. By learning this, your child will set a cornerstone for developing emotional intelligence which is extremely important for mental health. Initiate a conversation, validate their feelings, and make sure you’re not pushing too hard.

Embrace the benefits of art therapy

rainbow

There is a beautiful quote by the famous painter Pablo Picasso: Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life. Kids are naturally artistic and creative and surely – many find communicating via words exhausting or hard. Expressing thoughts and feelings is a lot easier with a white canvas to start with and the possibilities hidden behind highlighters, crayons, watercolors or ink. Art therapy is very efficient for children on the autism spectrum as they usually have different ways of interacting with people, in comparison to neurotypical persons. Children with autism have a specific sensor system which makes it hard to cope with the overwhelming sensations from the outer world. This can be rather stressful both for the child and the parent, but art has proven to be a great, gentle way for handling sensory processing issues and encouraging creative thinking.

A good night’s sleep is crucial

baby

Sleep is extremely important for your child’s physical and mental health. Stress can often disrupt sleep and you need to address this issue as quickly as possible. Insomnia is nerve-wracking and it makes every problem seem larger than it truly is. To ensure a good night’s sleep, try establishing a bedtime routine that will help your child unwind. Always provide clean and fresh sheets: use soothing scents such as vanilla or lavender to induce sleep. Air quality is also important: vent the room regularly to regulate humidity and temperature. A warm bath right before bed will calm your child and prepare their body for sleep. If insomnia stays persistent, your child might be struggling with melatonin deficiency and, therefore maybe needs supplements, but prior to taking any further steps on your own you should contact pediatrician, who might suggest some natural healing methods.

Try different ways of relaxation

nature-people-girl-forest-12165

Leisure time and light physical activity can help your child reach much-needed balance. Engage in a conversation with your little one in order to find a type of exercise that he will actually enjoy. It’s important to gradually build a healthy attitude towards these habits so that your child doesn’t perceive it as a boring duty. For example, cycling has multiple benefits and kids usually love it as a fun way to get to know the neighborhood or relax in nature. It triggers a healthy thirst for an adventure and helps with getting rid of any fears from the outer world. Also, encourage your child to enjoy quiet time and daydream. In this fast-paced world, we forget the importance of slowing down and just relaxing by doing nothing. Playtime is crucial for child’s healthy well-being as it helps kids develop their interests, discover new parts of their identities, build social skills, and handle emotions. It’s an irreplaceable source of happiness: humans are hardwired to enjoy playtime and it has proven to be a great way to reduce anxiety.

Encourage your child to find their own pace

children

From the earliest age, children are prone to comparing themselves to others. This may trigger anxiety, feelings of falling behind or not fitting in. Make sure your child understands the beauty of the diversity and that the only right tempo to follow in life is their own. Lead by the desire to belong to a certain group, your child might suppress their own identity that started forming, but it’s all part of growing up. Most children learn to value authenticity later in life.

Children are sensitive and they are like little sponges, soaking in everything around them and processing it in a very complex way. Support them in any way you can, as they have it harder than we may think.

Midway through December already!

 

I can’t quite believe we are halfway through December already! It seems only last week that it was summer. The weather is changing now, it’s much cooler and wetter and we’re entering a phase of relative hibernation. We are still enjoying our visits to Moors Valley and Upton Country Park though, as well as our Home ed. group meetings on Tuesdays. The children love to be outside when the weather and health permit. Making dens, seeing friends, playing and running. We’ve had a few coughs and colds over the last week or two, so have missed a few of our regular meet ups.

outdoor fun

 

Monday saw R turn 9, Daddy took the day and we spent time together unfortunately I was suffering from mild vertigo, and feeling rather dizzy. this meant that our day at Moors Valley had to be substituted for a trip the cinema, where I could sit down but the was still something for the children to enjoy. We went to see Moana, it was a great film full of Disney magic. Being a daytime viewing we had the cinema almost entirely to ourselves, which was lovely. Afterward we went home and had dinner chosen by R. Mexican wraps, her favourite.

December

 

Tuesday was home ed. group. It seems that no matter how many toys or electronics children have they love building forts, houses, cars and more out of cardboard boxes. The mud kitchen was also a hit, with a few requests for “more mud”! The children all enjoy helping to clear up afterwards too, sweeping and washing the floors. We’ve been up to lots of fun at home baking, painting, reading, and we even turned our front door into a snowman! How is your December so far?

cakes

Blogtober – An old photo

So on Day 2 of Blogtober I am sharing with you an old photo. It took me a while to find a photograph, or rather it took me a while to decide on which photo. I have chosen a photo of that means a lot to me because it reminds of someone very special. Someone I can no one longer see, except in my dreams. I am not sure how old the photo is, maybe 11 years.

It shows myself and my grandparents. My dad’s parents. We were on the promenade in a fishing town in Southern Spain not far from where my grandparents lived. On the right of the photograph is my late grandfather. He passed away 6 and a half years ago. Not a day goes past that I don’t miss him. He would phone up to moan about the weather, or something terrible on the news. He moaned about the traffic being bad in Spain when there were more than half a dozen cars on the road. It’s these things now that make me smile when I think about him.

My Granparents

He and my grandmother loved travelling around the world and everywhere they went they’d bring me a souvenir spoon, a tradition I have carried on in my own travels. They retired to Spain at the end of 2000 and I’ve had many great holidays there, on my own, with my husband and later with my children. I once spent a whole month there as a teenager, and then when I was 18 I took my grandmother with me to get my first (and only) tattoo!

I love Spain and my Grandparents, all of them, But I miss my granddad tremendously. “I’ll see you somewhere, sometime” x

 

I’m linked up with #blogtober16

Blogtober – Who Am I?


So, I have decided to take part in Blogtober. The idea is to blog everyday during October, whether I manage everyday is yet to be determined!

wedding day
So my first topic is Who Am I? When I get to tell you a little bit more about me. Well for starters my name is Tanya and I am 31. I live on the Dorset/Wiltshire border surrounded by gorgeous countryside. I have been married to Steve for just over 10 years and together for 11. We were engaged after just 7 weeks together and married within a year! A year and a half later we welcomed our first baby, a little girl. Our family grew and in less than 5 years we had 3 more little ones, 1 boy and 2 more girls.

my-4-chidlren
Growing up I was the eldest child, my younger brother and I always got on really well and still do now. I have very young parents (I made them grandparents at 38 years old) but I think great, my mum is one of my best friends. I knew all four of my grandparents, four of my great-grandparents and my great great grandmother. 3 of my grandparents are still here now, although life is so busy I don’t see them as often as I’d like to.
My great grandmother was honored when we named our first-born after her. We were very fortunate to manage a 5 generation photograph when R was born, just as my mother had when I was born.

5-generations
I adore being a mother, it is the absolute best thing in the entire world. Being able to spend all my time with my 4 children is amazing albeit a little tiring at times. For those that aren’t regular readers and don’t know me, I home educate my children. For various reasons the older 2 just weren’t happy at school, so we took them out in January 2015. Shortly afterwards we took our third out of pre-school and chose to educate them at home.
Since then we have grown closer as a family, the children’s confidence has increased, and they are enjoying learning again and at a pace that suits them.
So I guess that’s me and my family. I hope you’ll enjoy the rest of my Blogtober posts.

 

I am linked up with #Blogtober16

The Berry Saga!

My Goodness! What is it with children and the need to put things in places they really ought not to be? In this case, a berry.

BB (Before Berry)
BB (Before Berry)

Day 1
So Friday we thought it would be nice to enjoy the good weather and go along to a home ed meet up at Upton Country Park. The children enjoy going and having Nerf wars and exploring, whilst us parents drink tea and natter. We arrived at lunch time and I told the children that we could stay as long as they wanted as we had no further plans that day. Excited, they charged off, laden with various Nerf guns, in search of their friends.
All was going very well. After about 4 hours Little S walks up to me with her finger firmly wedged up her right nostril.

“Don’t put your finger up your nose, Poppet, it’s not nice” Says I.

“It’s sore” says she.

After a minute or two she takes me by the hand and walks me up to a berry bush and points at the berries.

“Do you have a berry up your nose?” I ask.

“Yes” she answers.

I have a good look and seeing no berry I send her on her way to play for a while longer before heading home.
At bedtime she complains that her nose is sore, so I have another look, this time with a torch. Still no sign of a foreign body. I know, I’ll do the “magic kiss”, I was taught it at the hospital when R put something up her nose. So I close off the good nostril and give a good blow into her mouth. Nothing pops out so I get the torch and have another look up her nose. This time though, I just glimpse something small and red up her nose. BLAST! What do I do?
Maybe another magic kiss will work, and blow that little berry out… Nope.
Hospital it is then. 9pm and we go off to A&E. It was completely empty. Great, get the berry and go home for a cuppa. Little S is good as gold, sits on the bed nicely and lets the nurse look up her nose. Nurse suggests one more magic kiss but it doesn’t work. Hmmmmm. It’s a bit high up for her to reach with tweezers. So we are sent home and told to return the next day to see a member of ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat.)

Tucking Teddy into bed
Tucking Teddy into bed

Day 2
Saturday morning and a kind ENT doctor telephones me at 10am and asks me to go down to A&E to remove the berry. We arrive at the hospital and let the receptionist know we’re there and we get called through quite quickly, so far so good. Only today Little S has decided she doesn’t like doctors and no one is going anywhere near her nose! After about an hour the doctor is able to get a tiny glimpse of the berry but by then he has already decided that we’re going to need to have it removed under general anesthetic at Southampton hospital.

Phoning the Doctor
Phoning the Doctor

Day 3
Arriving at 8:30am at the hospital slightly frazzled, sleep deprived and hungry, we go looking for our ward. As soon as we walk in we are greeted by an anesthetist who asks what happened and talks us through what they’re going to do. Name bands are attached to both Little S’s wrists and we wait patiently in the play room. ENT doctors come along and try to look at the berry, Little S doesn’t want to cooperate. So we wait for a space in theatre. And we wait. And we wait. At midday we are told that Little S can carry on drinking until 2:30pm meaning that surgery will not be before 4pm. By 2 o’clock Little S is getting quite grouchy so we go for a walk downstairs, I buy her a clear Fruitshoot as she’s not touching her water, we get her a magazine, a new teddy and go for a walk outside. I get myself a Costa hot chocolate to try and fill my tummy as I can’t possibly eat in front of my nil-by-mouth 3 year old, that would just be cruel.
We go back up to ward and they move us round to a different ward where Little S will be going after her anesthetic. There is a different playroom and a different set of toys, so it keeps her occupied for a while longer. Little S keeps the nursing staff amused by playing hopscotch on the pattern on the floor, and by giggling at absolutely everything. She keeps running up the corridor in her little hospital gown with her tiny bare bum poking out and she just looks adorable.
Eventually, at just before 7pm a member of theatre comes up to get us. We walk down to theatre with Little S asking the whole way “What’s that?” and pointing to all the different types of bed she can see. In theatre she sits on my knee and is quickly put to sleep, I lift her onto the trolley and watch as everyone bustles around putting an oxygen mask on her, checking machines and covering her in a blanket. I go back up to wait for her, grabbing myself something to eat on the way. When I get back to ward I’m told she’s in recovery. I’m still hungry.
I go to collect her and laugh as she frowns at everyone in the very cute way that she always frowns. Back at the ward she is given some toast, 24 hours after she last ate anything! An hour after coming out of recovery we are free to go home. It has been a very, very long weekend and I am mentally and physically drained. I just hope that she never puts a berry up her nose again!

 

My Random Musings

Adventure Wonderland

At the beginning of September Adventure Wonderland had an offer on entry price so, as the children had been asking to visit, we went along for the day. Daddy was a little reluctant as he’s not a big theme park person but he was glad we went as the children had a fantastic day.

pirate boat

R must have gone on the pirate boat ride at least a dozen times, she loved it so much! I think we managed to go on just about every ride between us. (We even got Daddy on some rides too.) There was the giant bouncy slide, the flying elephants, the Yo-Yo’s, the teacups, and the runaway train. We had lunch by the outdoor adventure playground where the children enjoyed having a run around and a play on the swings.

Flying elephants

After lunch we went to explore the maze, the girls all ran off in different directions and we all managed to get thoroughly lost trying to find each other again. It felt like we would never get out and we kept meeting other families who were all lost too! It was R who finally managed to guide us out.

After getting lost in the Adventure Wonderland maze we needed a rest so we went indoors to the soft play area. Little S loved loading the canons and firing them. Next it was time for a well deserved ice cream and a few more rides. R once again went in search of  the pirate boat.

The heavens opened at this point and as we were already wet we went to try the water boats. E, not being keen on getting wet, didn’t want to go on the boats. Instead he went back on the Yo-yo’s by himself! I was so proud of him, it was the ride just next to where I was queuing with S, but it’s a big thing for him to do something like that.

Myself and the 4 children on the teacup ride taking a funny face selfie

After the boat ride we were all soaked to our knickers and getting quite chilly so we called it a day and went home to warm up with a hot chocolate.